Casilda of Toledo – English

Cuando Casilda desplegó el manto, cayeronmuchas rosas.

When Casilda unfolded her cloak, many roses dropped from it.

‘Toledo’, located in central Spain, was a crossroads of Judaism, Islam and Christianity. It was a city at the crossroads of Judaism, Islam and Christianity. Famous as the favorite of the painter El Greco, it became the capital of the Visigoths in the 6th century, and from the 8th to the 11th century, during the reign of Fernando I, Toledo was under the rule of Muslim powers. The Moroccan king, Casilda of Almamun, was polite and kind-hearted, and carried food to the Christians his father had captured as prisoners of war. Casilda means ‘singing’ in Arabic, and she was kind to the captives, making a beautiful white rose bloom from a bad stem and extending the seeds of faith. Her retainers, who did not take it well, informed the king that they were going to execute Casilda.

The king loved his daughter, but he had no choice but to execute her after such an incident. When the retainer and the king pursued inside the cloak of Casilda, by God’s arrangement, the food that Casilda had hidden turned into white roses. She was acquitted of any blame.

Sacrifice, a self-sacrifice, and Deus Ex Machina, a mechanical god who casts a stone in a stifling situation. Casilda’s endgame can be described as deus ex machina. Self-sacrifice to gain an advantage exists in the world of chess, but Aristotle rejects the mechanistic god. I find it interesting that even in the seemingly inorganic world of chess, a world of logic, miracles happen. If you only play on the defensive, you will never make any progress, and pieces will always be taken. The value of the pieces constantly fluctuates, they attack, watch each other and choke. Every time a piece is taken in this context, it is analyzed to see if it is just a blunder or sacrificed. The game is constantly subjected to uncertainty, and sacrifice is established from the results.

The Christian self-sacrifice seems to be a measure, an ‘accident’ that represents to the invisible God. Does it include love? The only way to find out what God wants is to read the Bible in slowly and carefully. And above all, Jesus is only full of parables, and his stories must be replaced by our everyday life for us to consider. The words of Jesus must be lived in everyday life when faced with problems that are universally the same, even though Toledo and society changed in those days.

The Christian love, the kindness of Casilda, can be regarded as religious, but it is also the inherent goodness of human beings. Of course, some people did not show that goodness. She is unable to get prisoners out of prison. They carry food, although without consequence. Does that kindness, which does not leave the hungry behind, give strength to the misfortune of being a prisoner of war? On its own, Casilda was doomed to be executed as a traitor. However, We

 knows that miracles do not happen in everyday life.

Still, I want to stay awake to the goodness, to the love of God, because the breakout of miracles is indeed something that is always there.

Always that what we see and what we have in front of us is not everything.

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